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Coaching & Talent Development

  • 02 Jun 2020 10:56 AM
    Reply # 9009618 on 9009574
    Bill Brantley

    These are great tips! And I started following some of these.

    That is bad about breaking the trust of the clients. I would have had those folks fired. 

    Thank you for your kind offer. I will keep in touch.

    Dr. Bill Brantley


    Jeff Nally wrote:

    Bill -

    I experienced the same thing starting an executive coaching program inside a large corporation. Here are some lessons I learned that may help ensure your coaching program's success: 

    • Make sure you've uncovered the source(s) of the organization's experience with the stigma of 'fixing' people. When did that happen, what was involved, and how did the organization respond?  Dig, and don't assume your know the answers until people tell you where, when and why. At the company where I started and led the executive coaching practice, I uncovered that a 360 feedback process that was used in performance reviews 10 years prior was the source. I learned the some people in HR did not keep the feedback confidential, and that damaged trust across the company with feedback/360s and performance. I designed executive coaching so that the coachee had complete control over any 360 feedback. They were expected to share the results with their coach, but they were not required to share it with their HR partner or others. This dampened the old story that feedback can't be kept confidential (so neither would coaching!), and ensured executive coaching was perceived as a unique experience that is separate from the sole notion of feedback. 
    • If "leadership brand and your legacy" are the focus for the executive coaching program, that's great!  Now, define what brand and legacy mean, describe how and why they are important to your organization, and what the impact/benefits are when leaders craft their brands or legacies.  
    • Pilot! Pilot! Pilot!  As Brian shared, target a few, key, influencer-type, leaders in the company to have a sincere desire to craft their leadership brand and/or legacy. Although it takes time, gather their insights throughout their coaching journey, ask them to create stories about their coaching experience and the new brand/legacy they created in coaching, and (this is the important part >>>), the business/organizational impact of those brands/legacies. 
    • Market the coachee stories. Let the coachees be the voice of experience that will establish the credibility of your coaching program.  You're the expert who leads the coaching practice and process, but coachees are the "customers" who can speak from their coaching experience that reflect your successful program and process. I added "creating your story" to part of every executive coaching engagement so every leader could answer the question, "So, what did your get out of that executive coaching program?" with a 60-second elevator response AND a 15 minute presentation. 

    I'm happy to chat by phone or Zoom, review your marketing materials, or help in any way I can. -Jeff

    Jeff@NallyGroup.com 

    ------------

    Bill Brantley wrote:

    I just launched a career coaching program and am preparing to relaunch the executive coaching program. My paramount problem is overcoming the stigma of coaching being used to "fix" people. That is why I have spent a good deal of time marketing the positive aspects of coaching. For example, the rebranding of executive coaching is to encourage senior leadership to discover their leadership brand and explore the legacy they will leave.




  • 02 Jun 2020 10:54 AM
    Reply # 9009612 on 8995206
    Bill Brantley

    Thank you! When I start to give advice, I make myself count to 15 in my head so that I can give the client space to make additional comments. If the client asks for advice, I say that I could give advice but, the better solutions come from the client and the solution you the client come up with has a much better chance to be implemented. 

    Katie Ryan Fotiadis wrote:

    Bill, these are great!  AND so true.  I consistently practice not to give advice unless asked for it, but to facilitate answer mining, instead.  It's hard...hence the practice, but does become easier over time :)  In my experience, I don't particularly feel good about the exchange when someone tells me what they think I should do, if that's not what I asked for and can see the same expression on their face if I do that, as well.  And that doesn't feel good either.  It helps me to practice presence, listen, and pause before I jump into a response or reaction.  What helps you to keep from falling into the trap of advice giving?

    Bill Brantley wrote:

    Things not to do in coaching:

    1. Give advice

    2. Say "I know what you mean" before hearing the entire story

    3. Silently judge



  • 02 Jun 2020 10:38 AM
    Reply # 9009574 on 9007302

    Bill -

    I experienced the same thing starting an executive coaching program inside a large corporation. Here are some lessons I learned that may help ensure your coaching program's success: 

    • Make sure you've uncovered the source(s) of the organization's experience with the stigma of 'fixing' people. When did that happen, what was involved, and how did the organization respond?  Dig, and don't assume your know the answers until people tell you where, when and why. At the company where I started and led the executive coaching practice, I uncovered that a 360 feedback process that was used in performance reviews 10 years prior was the source. I learned the some people in HR did not keep the feedback confidential, and that damaged trust across the company with feedback/360s and performance. I designed executive coaching so that the coachee had complete control over any 360 feedback. They were expected to share the results with their coach, but they were not required to share it with their HR partner or others. This dampened the old story that feedback can't be kept confidential (so neither would coaching!), and ensured executive coaching was perceived as a unique experience that is separate from the sole notion of feedback. 
    • If "leadership brand and your legacy" are the focus for the executive coaching program, that's great!  Now, define what brand and legacy mean, describe how and why they are important to your organization, and what the impact/benefits are when leaders craft their brands or legacies.  
    • Pilot! Pilot! Pilot!  As Brian shared, target a few, key, influencer-type, leaders in the company to have a sincere desire to craft their leadership brand and/or legacy. Although it takes time, gather their insights throughout their coaching journey, ask them to create stories about their coaching experience and the new brand/legacy they created in coaching, and (this is the important part >>>), the business/organizational impact of those brands/legacies. 
    • Market the coachee stories. Let the coachees be the voice of experience that will establish the credibility of your coaching program.  You're the expert who leads the coaching practice and process, but coachees are the "customers" who can speak from their coaching experience that reflect your successful program and process. I added "creating your story" to part of every executive coaching engagement so every leader could answer the question, "So, what did your get out of that executive coaching program?" with a 60-second elevator response AND a 15 minute presentation. 

    I'm happy to chat by phone or Zoom, review your marketing materials, or help in any way I can. -Jeff

    Jeff@NallyGroup.com 

    ------------

    Bill Brantley wrote:

    I just launched a career coaching program and am preparing to relaunch the executive coaching program. My paramount problem is overcoming the stigma of coaching being used to "fix" people. That is why I have spent a good deal of time marketing the positive aspects of coaching. For example, the rebranding of executive coaching is to encourage senior leadership to discover their leadership brand and explore the legacy they will leave.



  • 01 Jun 2020 1:40 PM
    Reply # 9007302 on 8968177

    Bill,

    This is an interesting topic and definitely worth giving extra attention to in advance. Here a couple of tips that I've found helpful:

    1. Introduce the program as an opportunity for interested leaders to apply for one of the few limited spots. Incidentally, this is a good strategy to ensure each participant is fully committed to be engage before allocating precious time and money towards coaching someone who isn't fully committed. I'd launched programs were we skipped this step and it wasn't ideal.

    2. Engage other high level leaders in promoting their own previous executive coaching experiences (even outside your program). Showing new participants that well respected high level leaders have participated in executive coaching as a positive growth opportunity and reward helps eliminate the stigma. 

    3. If appropriate, promote other benefits of the program that may include stress reduction and helping manage pressures of work situations. 

    4. If you can only afford to set up a limited number of leaders at first, present it as a pilot program.  It's accurate and may help reduce fear that a few under performers are being targeted for coaching.

    We just wrapped an executive coaching program with nearly 3 dozen senior leaders. I'd be happy to discuss it with you, if you are interested.  Contact me anytime.

    Brian Houp, Brian.Houp@LetsReZone.com, 502.890.2008

    ------------

    Bill Brantley wrote:

    I just launched a career coaching program and am preparing to relaunch the executive coaching program. My paramount problem is overcoming the stigma of coaching being used to "fix" people. That is why I have spent a good deal of time marketing the positive aspects of coaching. For example, the rebranding of executive coaching is to encourage senior leadership to discover their leadership brand and explore the legacy they will leave.


  • 27 May 2020 8:34 AM
    Reply # 8995206 on 8995181
    Katie Ryan Fotiadis (Administrator)

    Bill, these are great!  AND so true.  I consistently practice not to give advice unless asked for it, but to facilitate answer mining, instead.  It's hard...hence the practice, but does become easier over time :)  In my experience, I don't particularly feel good about the exchange when someone tells me what they think I should do, if that's not what I asked for and can see the same expression on their face if I do that, as well.  And that doesn't feel good either.  It helps me to practice presence, listen, and pause before I jump into a response or reaction.  What helps you to keep from falling into the trap of advice giving?

    Bill Brantley wrote:

    Things not to do in coaching:

    1. Give advice

    2. Say "I know what you mean" before hearing the entire story

    3. Silently judge


  • 27 May 2020 8:07 AM
    Reply # 8995181 on 8966636
    Bill Brantley

    Things not to do in coaching:

    1. Give advice

    2. Say "I know what you mean" before hearing the entire story

    3. Silently judge

  • 26 May 2020 7:48 PM
    Reply # 8994324 on 8966636
    Katie Ryan Fotiadis (Administrator)

    WOW!!!  I am totally blown away and so grateful for tonight's program: Focusing on Coaching & Talent Development.  With so much more to chat about, we didn't want the party to end!  So, I've posted post some more questions here, but feel free to post some of your own.  Let's put our minds together and share our thoughts, resources, and support to help one another & nurture alignment with ATD's capability for coaching.


    After party/follow-up questions:

    • What things do you think of as the “not to dos” in coaching?
    • How do you foster feedback conversations in your organization?
    • How do you use coaching techniques to get what you need from SMEs, business partners, peers, etc.?
    • How do you leverage HR, training and development, and other internal resources, before you determine if you need a coach?
  • 16 May 2020 9:15 AM
    Reply # 8972861 on 8966636
    Jeff Nally

    Hey Bill - Yes, that's a common challenge.  I experienced the same push-back when I launched an executive coaching program. We focused on preparing previously-successful leaders to shift their success to our company's new markets, challenges, and growth. You're right, the brand and focus for coaching should be aligned with the needs and culture of the organization. #NoFixing #GrowThroughCoaching #CoachingForSuccess

  • 14 May 2020 7:47 AM
    Reply # 8968177 on 8966636
    Bill Brantley

    I just launched a career coaching program and am preparing to relaunch the executive coaching program. My paramount problem is overcoming the stigma of coaching being used to "fix" people. That is why I have spent a good deal of time marketing the positive aspects of coaching. For example, the rebranding of executive coaching is to encourage senior leadership to discover their leadership brand and explore the legacy they will leave.

  • 13 May 2020 3:08 PM
    Message # 8966636
    Katie Ryan Fotiadis (Administrator)

    ATD's Capability Model says that, "Coaching is a discipline and practice that is an essential capability for any talent development professional and it has the power to catalyze breakthroughs to enhance individual, team, and organizational performance. Coaching is an interactive process that helps individuals develop more rapidly toward a preferred future state, produce results, set goals, take action, make better decisions, and capitalize on their natural strengths. Coaching requires using global listening, asking powerful questions, strengthening conversations, and creating action plans." (https://tdcapability.org/#/professional/coaching)

    Does your organization or do you face any concerns with utilizing coaching in conjunction with your current training and development?

ATD Kentuckiana | 3044 Bardstown Road, #1275 | Louisville, KY 40205

 

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